CITIZEN SCIENCE

Citizen Science is the practice of involving citizens in scientific research by contributing to the increase of scientific knowledge. Citizens around the world can act as scientists by providing important information, which significantly enhances research. Citizen Science projects related to biodiversity and the natural environment have the potential to 1) provide massive data spatiotemporality that can contribute to the rapid and science-based decision-making for the management of natural resources, 2) enhance environmental awareness and the environmental literacy of the participants, through the continuous information they receive and the relationship they cultivate with the natural environment, 3) to provide information that will be used for the creation of problem-solving strategies. For the last 5 years, iSea has been successfully implementing two Citizen Science projects on marine biodiversity, the "Is it Alien to you… Share it!!!" and the "Sharks and Rays in Greece and Cyprus", while now, with the support of the Goulandris Museum of Natural History, iSea manages iNaturalistGR, the "gateway" of Greece to the iNaturalist community, the largest group of naturalists in the world!


 

ON-GOING PROJECTS

iNaturalist Greece

iNaturalistGR is the "gateway" of Greece to the world of iNaturalist, one of the world’s most popular nature apps and thethe largest group of naturalists in the world!!!

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Axios National Park Bioblitz

We celebrate the biodiversity of Axios Delta National Park through a bioblitz! Read more

Is it Alien to you…. Share it!!!

Help us gather more information on the distribution of marine alien, rare, protected, and endangered species in Greece and Cyprus. Become a researcher and send your observations !!!.

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Sharks and Rays in Greece and Cyprus

Sharks and rays have been present on earth for nearly half a billion years, with more than 1,250 extant species. The pivotal importance of cartilaginous fish for marine ecosystems is highlighted by the fact that most shark and some ray species constitute top predators, thus possess central and stabilizing functions in marine food webs.

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